1.03.2011

Lens Love: Diana 38 mm Super Wide

     About a week ago, I posted my Sunday Shopping Guide of some things I would love to buy with my Christmas money. Although the purchases might not have gone exactly as planned, there was on gem I KNEW I had to have. This lovely lens, the Diana 38mm Super Wide angle, was on the top of my wishlist for about a year and a half. Finally, I took the plunge and bought the adapter and lens kit for my beloved Canon from Photojojo. With expidited shipping at a mere $6.00, I giddily expected the lens to arrive within a few days after the purchase.
     I immediately put the new lens on when I found the package strewn on my couch (my parents obviously didn't know that precious cargo was inside). Here are some pictures from the first day of shooting:

     If you are not familiar with Diana and other Lomography products, they are not meant to achieve a particularly "high tech" look. More along the lines of living in a daydream, the pictures taken with cameras such as Holga and Diana are known for their interesting light leaks, odd focusing, and surrealistic effects. The Diana lens and adapter for dSLRs is a good substitute; however, for the true fun of the cameras analog is the way to go!
    After getting to know the lens over the past week or so, here are my opinions:
Pros-
  • If searching for a dreamy contrast to the clarity that dSLRs usually offer, this is the lens for you!
  • Cuts back on the cost of getting colored film developed and prints made. (Usually Walgreens charges around $8 for a 24 exposure roll and $6 for a CD with digital copies of film pictures.)
  • Achieves unique photographs without much editing. The pictures above were not edited at all to show the true nature of the lens.
  • Gives an excellent representation of natural light! I don't know what it is about the plastic sweetheart but Diana sure delivers great looking light in pictures.
  • With only the adapter on, camera functions as a pretty nifty bokeh (a cool device that creates interesting effects with light). 
  • Awesome lens flare effects!
Cons-
  • Extremely light sensitive to sunshine. I have never used my camera on such a high shutter speed before.
  • Not sensitive at all to indoor light. I like to be pretty hassle free when taking test shots, but otherwise I'd happily grab a tripod. With a film camera (the lens/adapter functions with either), I'd probably grab a shutter release cord!
  • Of course, there is no zoom. With a pretty limited focus range as it is, close ups are pretty hard.
  • Doesn't offer the same light leaks and unpredictable exposure as analog.
  • Some photos have a little bit of noise, easily remedied with Photoshop.
      Overall, I am quite satisfied with the results. The lens lives up to my year and a half of yearning. If you are looking for a fairly inexpensive, easy way to shake up your photography routine I would definitely recommend buying this adapter and lens.

3 comments:

skeletaldreams said...

thank you for your lovely comment!
this is a great post, your photos are beautiful.
stunning blog x

The Velvet Bow said...

I just found out about this too and I am seriously considering getting one. Worth the $60 do you think?

Michelle said...

Oh, it takes beautiful photos! I'm still learning my way around photography, and this will be a stupid question, but does it only work on the Diana camera - or other lomography/film cameras? Or could I attach it to my Canon D450 SLR? x

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